Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

Signs of Resistance

ebook

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003
A reinterpretation of early 20th century Deaf history, with sign language at its center
During the nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly.
Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history: using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity and political organization.


Expand title description text
Publisher: NYU Press

Kindle Book

  • Release date: November 1, 2002

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780814789988
  • File size: 3127 KB
  • Release date: November 1, 2002

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9780814789988
  • File size: 3127 KB
  • Release date: November 1, 2002

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003
A reinterpretation of early 20th century Deaf history, with sign language at its center
During the nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly.
Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; not only did Deaf students continue to use sign language in schools, hearing teachers relied on it as well. In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history: using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language and Deaf teachers, in the process facilitating the formation of collective Deaf consciousness, identity and political organization.


Expand title description text
  • Details

    Publisher:
    NYU Press

    Kindle Book
    Release date: November 1, 2002

    OverDrive Read
    ISBN: 9780814789988
    File size: 3127 KB
    Release date: November 1, 2002

    EPUB ebook
    ISBN: 9780814789988
    File size: 3127 KB
    Release date: November 1, 2002

  • Creators
  • Formats
    Kindle Book
    OverDrive Read
    EPUB ebook
  • Languages
    English
Check Out What's Being Checked Out Right NowThe Ohio Digital Library is a program of the State Library of Ohio and is supported in whole or in part by federal Institute of Museum and Library Services funds, awarded to the State Library of Ohio.